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fuckyeahmathandsciencetattoos:

Schrödinger equation with an electron trapped in a well.  That’s the uncertainty principle on my foot too, but it’s hard to see.  I’ve got a bunch more all over me, but I just happened to have this picture handy.  twitter: @jasonthalken

fuckyeahmathandsciencetattoos:

Schrödinger equation with an electron trapped in a well.  That’s the uncertainty principle on my foot too, but it’s hard to see.  I’ve got a bunch more all over me, but I just happened to have this picture handy.  twitter: @jasonthalken

fuckyeahmathandsciencetattoosFuck Yeah, Math and Science Tattoos!http://fuckyeahmathandsciencetattoos.tumblr.com/post/93239426643/schrodinger-equation-with-an-electron-trapped-in-a
Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate.
fullbodiedlovinRedefine Beautyhttp://fullbodiedlovin.tumblr.com/post/93248759387/promote-what-you-love-instead-of-bashing-what-youhttp://thedailypositive.net/post/93248336866/promote-what-you-love-instead-of-bashing-what-you
NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False
ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:
SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.

Deacon, B. J. (2013). The biomedical model of mental disorder: A critical analysis of its validity, utility, and effects on psychotherapy research. Clinical Psychology Review, 33, 846-861.

Deacon, B. J. (2013). The biomedical model of mental disorder: A critical analysis of its validity, utility, and effects on psychotherapy research. Clinical Psychology Review, 33, 846-861.

emersonactivemindsActive Minds at Emerson Collegehttp://emersonactiveminds.tumblr.com/post/92780327201/deacon-b-j-2013-the-biomedical-model-ofhttp://cognitivedefusion.tumblr.com/post/92675879957/deacon-b-j-2013-the-biomedical-model-of
youngblackandvegan:


black excellence

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

afro-dominicanokenhttp://afro-dominicano.tumblr.com/post/92834556060/youngblackandvegan-black-excellencehttp://tsunamiwavesurfing.tumblr.com/post/92829346271
Has it ever struck you … that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quickly you hardly catch it going? It’s really all memory … except for each passing moment.
Eric Kandel, “In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind” (via neuromorphogenesis)
afro-dominicanokenhttp://afro-dominicano.tumblr.com/post/92839396000/has-it-ever-struck-you-that-life-is-all-memoryhttp://neuromorphogenesis.tumblr.com/post/92836065260/has-it-ever-struck-you-that-life-is-all-memory

mollycrabapple:

Had the great honor of being asked to come along with Zeitouna, a program by the  Karam Foundation, to mentor displaced Syrian kids. A few dozen of us came to the Salam School, a school of in Southeast Turkey for refugees. Dentists from the Syrian American Medical Society fixed hundreds of kids teeth. Boxers taught little girls to kickbox, and my friend Lina Sergie introduced the kids to the fundaments of architecture. I drew these murals

The teachers, refugees themselves, were brilliant and inspiring. I’m shy and not particularly great with kids, and my Arabic has faded to a few sentences.  But the kids loved watching me draw cats and mice up to no good all over the walls.

Photos by Mohamad Ojjeh.

mollycrabappleDemographic of Onehttp://mollycrabapple.tumblr.com/post/92931078237

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

skunkbearSkunk Bearhttp://skunkbear.tumblr.com/post/92537757861/baby-chimp
Discrimination isn’t a thunderbolt, it isn’t an abrupt slap in the face. It’s the slow drumbeat of being underappreciated, feeling uncomfortable and encountering roadblocks along the path to success.
Astrophysicist Meg Urry, quoted in "Girls Love Science. We Tell Them Not To." (via almost-a-class-act)
afro-dominicanokenhttp://afro-dominicano.tumblr.com/post/92549503310/discrimination-isnt-a-thunderbolt-it-isnt-anhttp://almost-a-class-act.tumblr.com/post/92537716799/discrimination-isnt-a-thunderbolt-it-isnt-an

kimberlysugar812:

It’s for science.

barbellsandbehaviorismBarbells & Behaviorismhttp://barbellsandbehaviorism.tumblr.com/post/92335514839/kimberlysugar812-its-for-sciencehttp://kimberlysugar812.tumblr.com/post/42244275344/its-for-science
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